Indoor swimming pool vs outdoor swimming pool: How much does it cost to install?

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How much does a swimming pool cost?

Believe or not, people in Scotland do install outdoor swimming pools. Seems mad, I know! But around half the pools that we install in Scotland are outdoor swimming pools. 

We’ve got a blog post on how much a swimming pool costs. And in that we mention that indoor swimming pools are more expensive. 

In this blog, we talk about how much more indoor swimming pools cost. And most importantly why indoor swimming pools are more expensive. 

Cost is a big influencer when it comes to deciding on whether you want to install a swimming pool or not. Hopefully this blog will help you decide on what 

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How much more does an indoor swimming pool cost?

Indoor swimming pools cost on average £25,000 more than an outdoor swimming pool. There are two main reasons that indoor swimming pools cost more:

1. The pool room 

2. Heating and ventilation

These two things are responsible for the massive price variance. The overall price will still, of course, vary based on all the other factors that usually vary cost (eg. size, type of construction, overflow vs skimmer etc).

 

1. Indoor swimming pools: cost of a pool room

in-ground spaThe main reason that an indoor swimming pool costs more actually has nothing to do with the swimming pool itself. 

It’s the space that the swimming pool is housed in, often known as the pool hall. 

Indoor swimming pools are usually built as part of an extension or a new build. It’s rare that an existing space is converted. Therefore, part of the cost is for the building. You have to factor in the cost of building the space, plus all the materials and trades that are required to finish the space ie. tilers, painter, electricians. 

All this doesn’t actually factor into the £25,000 price difference. It’s on top of the swimming pool price. But it does mean that the overall price for building your swimming pool will be more, so is important to factor in.

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2. Indoor swimming pool costs: heating and ventilation

The second thing that is responsible for the massive price variance is the heating and ventilation required for and indoor swimming pool. 

Outdoor swimming pools need to be heated (unless you want to freeze in Scotland). But it’s futile (and impossible) to try and control the air temperature or humidity for an outdoor swimming pool. To heat an outdoor swimming pool you need a heat pump, which is about £1500-£8000, depending on how big the pool is, how hot you want the water to be and how many months of the year you want to run the swimming pool for. 

In comparison, an indoor swimming pool requires a little more control.  Not only do you need to control the temperature of the water. But you also need to control the air temperature and humidity in the pool hall. This is sometimes done using a dehumidifier. But is often done using an air handling unity (AHU), which heats the water, heats the air and controls the humidity. This is a very efficient way of heating a pool, and stops moisture build up from ruining the finishings in the pool hall. 

An air handling unit is expensive to install, usually anywhere between £8000 and £30,000 depending on what size and model you require. This doesn’t include the parts and labour to install the ventilation system, which need to be factored in. 

The heating and ventilation is really what is responsible for the average £25,000 difference between an outdoor and an indoor swimming pool in Scotland. 

 

In conclusion

Indoor swimming pools are more expensive than outdoor swimming pools. On average £25,000 more for the pool installation alone. Plus, you have to factor in all the other accessory costs that you will have to pay to have a finished pool hall (eg. painters, electricians, builders etc.).

It’s a big difference in cost. But you also have to consider the value of the pool. Will you use it more if it’s indoors or outdoors. How can you maximise the amount of times you use your swimming pool and therefore the value that you get from your pool? 

All of this is important when deciding what pool to install and it’s not just about cost, but the value that you will get from it. 

 

Debbie Ekins
Debbie Ekins
Eagle Leisure - Sales & Marketing Manager Mission = to arm you with the knowledge you need to make the best buying decisions. Fuelled by coffee (and naps). Explorer of Scotland and the world.
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